Tag Archives: sword

Notice: I’m Looking for Book Reviewers

Hi All,

This is an open request to any fantasy fans out there. I have previously published two novels: “Drasmyr” and “The Children of Lubrochius.” “Drasmyr” is the prequel to my series “From the Ashes of Ruin,” and “The Children of Lubrochius” is Book I in that same series. I’ve completed the final draft of Book II “The Sceptre of Morgulan” and I’m looking for reviewers. If you have read the prequel and Book I, great, I’m hoping you will consider reading Book II and reviewing it for me in exchange for a free PDF copy (ebook only). If you have not read any of my books, I’d like to recruit you to review all three: “Drasmyr,” “The Children of Lubrochius,” and “The Sceptre of Morgulan.” I know that’s a lot of books and they are all 100k+ words in length, but I’m sure you’ll enjoy the series and it will be worth your while. The deal will be the same as above: free ebooks (all 3) in exchange for an honest review of each (although “Drasmyr” is free for everyone). If you start reading the series and decide you don’t wish to continue, let me know and I will drop your name from my list of reviewers. No hard feelings.

Just for your information, although a vampire has a major role in this series it is not a romantic role. The vampire in this series is evil; he’s kind of my sinister alter-ego. It is nothing like “Twilight.” The series as a whole could best be described as a cross between “Dracula” and “The Lord of the Rings,” or perhaps an AD&D style story. Additionally, you should be informed that I am planning two more books for this series, so that in the end it’ll be a four book series with a prequel, or five books in all.

I would ask that all reviewers post a review on Amazon and on Smashwords. Especially Smashwords.

If you are interested, send me a DM on Twitter: @MatthewDRyan1. Then we can exchange e-mails and go from there.

Thanks in advance.

Matthew D. Ryan
Author of “Drasmyr,” “The Children of Lubrochius,” and “The Sceptre of Morgulan.”

Book Review: Warbreaker

“Warbreaker” by Brandon Sanderson is another well-crafted piece of fantasy literature. It tells the story of two kingdoms: Idris and Hallandren. Although in the beginning of the story, the two kingdoms are not at war with each other, tensions are still high and close to the breaking point from the get-go. The bulk of the story takes place in the capitol of Hallandren, a city by the name of T’Telir. There are four main characters in the book: Siri, Vivenna, Vasher, and Lightsong.

 

Siri and Vivenna are both princesses of the kingdom of Idris; one is sent to be the bride of the Hallandren God King, the other sneaks away to cause mischief in T’Telir. Lightsong is a “god” living amongst the other divinities that rule T’Telir from their grand court. Vasher is, well, Vasher. He’s something of a rogue agent with his own plans and abilities. He carries the deadly sword Nightblood, which is another character in its own right, as the sword is sentient. The story is an intriguing mix of politics, mercenary mischief, and treachery. Again, Brandon Sanderson has devised a clever magic system which he incorporates throughout the story. The system is based on Breath and color. Yep, color. The Breath comes from people: us mere mortals are born with but one Breath. Breath can be bought and sold, as one wishes. The Breath is used primarily to animate things—non-living material can move and act according to the wishes of the individual using the Breath. Color is used to power the Breath, draining away to grey when it is expended. It’s an intriguing, and creative system that Brandon Sanderson gets a lot of mileage out of in this book. He uses it in a number of ways that would not be apparent at first.

 

Overall, the book was decent. It took me a while to really get into it, but I wouldn’t say it was boring by any stretch of the imagination. Maybe the beginning was slow, but that could have just as well been a result of adapting to the unusual magic system. It picks up nicely at the end. There are a number of clever twists and turns (although I did pick out one of them in advance—ha ha J). I did have a problem with the ending though. There were basically two story-threads going. One resolved nicely with a big climactic sword fight. The other… not so much. It built up nicely, but then almost skipped over the part I really wanted to read about, describing it only in passing. Anyway, the story formed a complete logical whole; I didn’t notice any loose ends worth mentioning at the end of the book; everything was wrapped up nicely.

 

Overall, I’ll give this book three and a half stars, or even four on a good day.

 

This review was originally posted on Goodreads on 9-4-12.