Tag Archives: sci-fi literature

Book Review: Firefight (2015: Brandon Sanderson) (4 ½ *’s)

Firefight by Brandon Sanderson is the second book in his series The Reckoners. It is a young adult novel. In a nutshell, the series is about evil super-heroes (called Epics) and the attempts of common humans to take them down. Basically, it’s set in an alternate Earth where a strange cosmic occurrence happens—a burning red star-like object appears in the sky—and a small sub-population of the humans inhabiting Earth are granted supernatural abilities. The first book in the series was entitled Steelheart (click to see my review) and it dealt with the destruction of the powerful Epic of the same name. The main character in both that tale and this one is a common human named David who has joined the underground resistance known as “The Reckoners.” They are led by a mysterious man referred to as Prof (for professor) who unbeknownst to many (although not David) is a powerful Epic himself who has sworn off using his abilities.

In the book Firefight, David leaves his home of Newcago (Chicago) and travels with his group of Reckoners to Babylon Restored (a borough of Manhattan). Although the Reckoners have a purpose there—to take down the ruling Epic and all other Epics in her service—David has plans of his own. He wants to find another powerful Epic—Firefight—an illusionist Epic who served in the Prof’s command undercover for Steelheart in the preceding novel. Basically, David has a crush on her, or perhaps is even in love with her, and he believes he can save her and convince to keep from using her powers so she will be normal. This sets up conflict with the Reckoners, because Prof wants her dead as he wants all the Epics dead.

Strengths: this is Brandon Sanderson’s work, so the strengths are many. The writing, of course, was excellent. It also had good, believable characters with well-developed personalities and emotions. Lots of conflict and tension. An interesting, convoluted plot (but not too much); I could follow everything without getting too confused. The twists and turns of the story were clever: some I saw coming, others I did not. It was a very enjoyable read. Weaknesses: maybe the fact that I saw some of the twists coming could count against it, but not by me. I prefer a novel I can follow that doesn’t become so convoluted everything seems forced.

Ultimately, I’ll give Brandon Sanderson’s Firefight four and a half stars out of five.

Book Review: The Rithmatist (Brandon Sanderson)

The Rithmatist is a nearly four hundred page young adult novel by Brandon Sanderson. I guess it’s kind of a steampunk/fantasy hybrid (although I’m not really sure—I don’t read steampunk at all). Anyway, it seems to be a story of a parallel Earth where the technology has evolved to the point where everything is based on gears. Further, there is a discipline of magic known as Rithmatics. Rithmatics is an art that is based on drawing circles, lines, and characters on the ground to summon up mystical barriers, and small two-dimensional beings called chalklings, and using such to combat an enemy. It’s quite intricate and rather interesting.

 

Anyway, the story is focused on Joel, a young student at the school of learning known as Armedia. Armedia is one of the eight schools in the United Isles (a parallel of the United States and North America) where Rithmatics is taught and studied. Joel is a precocious young man totally enthralled by and enchanted with Rithmatics. He knows more about Rithmatics than any other non-Rithmatist, and probably even some Rithmatist students. Unfortunately, he is not a Rithmatist: only a select few are chosen, and Joel missed his chance.

 

Shortly into the story, Joel is delivering a message to one of the Rithmatic professors (Professor Fitch). As fate would have it, a new professor, Professor Nalizar, interrupts the class to challenge Fitch for his position. Unprepared and somewhat flustered, Fitch loses the confrontation. He surrenders his place in class and is reduced in rank. Shortly thereafter, Rithmatic students begin disappearing from off-campus. Is Nalizar involved? The timing is curious, and Joel is suspicious, if for no reason than that he does not like Nalizar at all. Anyway, the principal assigns Fitch to investigate, and Joel to assist. Hopefully, together they can unravel the mystery and not fall prey to the mysterious Scribbler, the perpetrator of the heinous crimes.

 

Strengths: The writing is excellent, the plotline enjoyable, and the magic system involved and interesting. The characters are well-developed and likeable. And the resolution was well-crafted and not easily foreseen. Weaknesses: to be honest, I can’t think of any serious weaknesses. With Sanderson there’s usually some kind of humor that just seems forced, but not in this book. For some reason, I wasn’t 100% engaged in the book, but I was engaged. Whatever it was lacking, I can’t quite put my finger on.

 

Anyway, I’ll give The Rithmatist by Brandon Sanderson four and a half stars out of five.