Monthly Archives: January 2015

Movie Review: Exodus: Gods and Kings: (3 ½ *’s) (2014)

Exodus: Gods and Kings is the latest Hollywood attempt at making a movie from a biblical story. The film stars Christian Bale as Moses, as well as Sigourney Weaver and Ben Kingsley in two minor roles. There are other actors, of course, but none with names as big as these.

The story is basically the main story of the book of Exodus in the Bible. The Israelites are forced to seek refuge in Egypt from a famine (I think that’s accurate). At some point in their stay there, they are declared slaves and forced to build many of the great structures of ancient Egypt. Their slavery lasts four hundred years, giving them time to multiply, be beaten down, and ruthlessly oppressed. They call out to God, but it seems that he does not hear, until a savior is born. A child by the name of Moses who escapes certain death by being abandoned in the Nile by his mother and found by a member of the royal family. He is raised a prince in Pharoah’s house unaware of his true heritage. He visits the Jews in their servitude. One of them tells him the truth; he does not believe him, so goes on his way. He is accosted by an Egyptian guard whom he kills. He is banished from Egypt for the murder, sentenced to live in exile. In the desert he is tested and tried until he finds a new home and family. Then, he has a terrible fall and encounters God and his whole life changes.

Strengths: the acting was good, the story was engaging, and had one or two embellishments which added to it in an acceptable fashion. There were no terrible holes in the plot. The God in the movie acted through nature as opposed to in contradiction of nature … which can be a plus or a minus depending on how you want to look at it. Biblical purists probably won’t like that aspect of it. Weaknesses: they had an Egyptian counselor who explained the plagues of Egypt in a scientific fashion that seemed too advanced for the time in question. But that is what you are probably most likely reduced to when you have a God that works through nature. Also, the plagues were over in a heartbeat. Finally, I didn’t like the portrayal of God as a child; in fact, God, at times, seemed almost demonic to me. Oh yes, and one more thing, the movie didn’t seem to have a clear grasp that Moses was the servant, and God was the God. When he was inscribing the Ten Commandments Moses said, “I wouldn’t inscribe them, if I didn’t agree with them.” That’s a bit touchy. It’s really not Moses place to agree or disagree with God. And Bible purists will probably take issue with that as well.

Anyway, despite its faults, it was an entertaining movie, and I’ll give Exodus: Gods and Kings three and a half stars out of five.

Book Review: Stardust (Neil Gaiman) (3 ½ *’s)

Stardust is the second novel of Neil Gaiman’s that I’ve read. The other was The Ocean at the End of the Lane. Like Ocean, Stardust is a relatively short novel with reasonably long chapters that were broken up into short subsections. I saw the movie a few years back. I enjoyed the movie, so I figured I’d give the book a go. It was an easy quick read; in fact, I read the entire novel in a single day. The main character in the novel is a seventeen-year-old young man by the name of Tristran, who is hopelessly besotted with the youthful beauty Victoria. In a fit of indifference, hoping to put off Tristran and his advances, Victoria says she will give him whatever he wants, if he finds the star they both witness falling. Much to her surprise, Tristran agrees and heads out of town in pursuit. There is a catch, of course; it’s called Faerie.

Tristran and Victoria live in a town called Wall, named because it has grown up in the shadow of a long wall separating our world from the world of Faerie that lies on the other side of the wall. There is a hole in the wall, a gateway between the two worlds. Once every nine years the two worlds meet in something of a Faerie Market which is held on the Faerie side of the wall for three days. It is quite the event, and it was a liaison there between Tristran’s father and a captured Faerie woman that led to Tristran’s birth. Tristran does not yet know that he is half Faerie, but his quest to please Victoria will lead him on many revealing adventures. It is this quest which consumes the bulk of the story. Tristran does find the star he is looking for, but it is not anything like what he expects. Still, he endeavors to bring it back to Victoria, no matter the cost.

Strengths: the prose was excellent; the characters were reasonably well-developed given the time and space the author had. The plot was okay: Perhaps the natural surprise and intrigue suffered because I had seen the movie previously. Weaknesses: I take issue with a few things. There were several elements in the novel that jarred on me because they seemed more appropriate for an adult book than something written in the Fairy-Tale type of style and tone that Stardust seemed to embody to me. There was a sex scene (although not too graphic), and a few profanities like p*** (which isn’t a really big one), and also f***. Like I said, they just didn’t fit the tone of the novel as a whole and were therefore kind of jarring. In any event, the novel never really gripped me. It wasn’t bad. It just lacked something I can’t define.

I’ll give Neil Gaiman’s Stardust three and a half stars out of five.

Book Review: Emperor of Thorns (Mark Lawrence) (4 *’s)

Emperor of Thorns is the third book of Mark Lawrence’s Broken Empire series. You can find my reviews of the preceding books here: Prince of Thorns and King of Thorns. I’ve been looking forward to this book, and I enjoyed it considerably. It continues the story of Jorg Ancrath, now a king, 20 (I think) years of age. He’s still ruthless and basically corrupt, but he has grown to care for his pregnant wife and soon-to-be born son. And now he has his eyes set on the throne of the Emperor which has been vacant for over one hundred years.

The story begins with Jorg Ancrath and a small contingent of his loyal forces being escorted by the Gilden Guards to the formal meeting of the kings to select an emperor called the Congression. Much of the present day tale follows him and his journey on the road. He encounters undead creatures of various sorts: common undead soldiers, and more powerful lichkin. Throughout there are flashbacks to Jorg’s adventures five years ago when he traveled to radiation poisoned lands in search of ancient technology, the land of the Moors to meet a powerful caliph and his mathmagician, and to Vyene, the seat of the empire. He has his trials and tribulations along the way, influenced by both modern magic and ancient technologies (that’s kind of a funny twist I just noticed: modern magic and ancient technology). The whole leads to a climax in the Empire’s throne room where he confronts the horror of horrors: the Dead King, leader of the unholy armies of the dead.

Strengths: the writing was excellent, the story gripping and sufficiently convoluted to keep me engaged, and the plot was well done. Weaknesses: I’ve said in my prior two reviews that I was not fond of the character of Jorg as a main character since he’s basically evil. He’s grown on me to a certain extent, and I do enjoy his adventures now. He’s grown a little: he cares somewhat for his wife and even more for his son. That doesn’t justify anything he’s done, and makes the juxtaposition between himself and savior of the realms an odd one, to say the least. Finally, I was raised Catholic and the prevalent corruption throughout his Church did not appeal to me. He can paint his Church any way he likes, of course, and the modern Catholic Church has known some well-deserved criticism for its moral failings at times, but not one of the priests in these novels really measured up to any of the priests I have known in my life.

Anyway, I enjoyed the book and I’ll give Emperor of Thorns four stars out of five.

Movie Review: Into the Woods: (4 stars) (2014)

Into the Woods is the latest musical released into theatres by Disney. It follows the tradition of many animated features, but is a live-action film with lots of singing. It showcases a lot of talented actors and actresses in it. The most significant are: Meryl Streep (as the witch), Emily Blunt (as the Baker’s Wife), Johnny Depp (as the Wolf), James Corden (as the Baker), and Anna Kendrick (as Cinderella). The tale told incorporates four famous Fairy Tales into a single tale woven around a Baker and his wife.

The Baker and his wife are childless. At the beginning of the movie, they learn that this is the result of a curse. A witch offers to reverse the curse, if the pair obtain four special items integral to four concurrent fairy tales: a cow white as snow, a golden slipper, yellow hair like corn, and a cape red as blood. The cow, of course, belongs to Jack (Jack and the Beanstalk), the slipper belongs to Cinderella, the yellow hair belongs to Rapunzel, and the red cape belongs to Little Red Riding Hood. Desperately, the Baker and his Wife enter the wood in search of the four items, items with which the owners may not easily part. Each tale interweaves with the others creating a tapestry of mystery and magic.

Strengths: it was a musical, so the acting qua acting (love that word) was minimal, but what there was was very good. There was lots of singing, and the singing was well-performed as well. The special effects were good, and the plot was engaging. The dialogue, via song and sometimes not, was also good. Weaknesses: the movie was dark at times, possibly too dark for the very young. However, it was rated PG, not G, so I would think that parents should be cautioned against bringing the very young to the film. My biggest complaint comes at the end. And it has nothing to do with plot, acting, or dialogue. One of the last musical numbers played in the song had questionable lyrics. There was a lot of “There is no right or wrong,” or something to that effect. Disney did the same thing briefly in Frozen, an animated film I richly enjoyed. I just do not think it is a good idea to try to instill in our children that there is no moral truth. Yes, I get the notion that we all make mistakes. But you can only understand a mistake through a moral lens. The music itself was fine … it was just the words were not appropriate, I think. Also of concern to parents, I’m sure, was when the Baker’s Wife and Cinderella’s prince (married prince, at that) had a brief tryst in the woods.

Despite its flaws, it was still an enjoyable film and I’ll give Disney’s Into the Woods a full four stars out of five.