World-building Athron: Timekeeping: Weeks

 

Continuing on the theme of time management in world-building a fantasy world, I’ll turn now to the week. In our world (in the West), we have fifty-two weeks in a year, each lasting seven days but it strains the laws of credibility to use a corresponding seven day week consisting of Sunday, Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, and Saturday for your fantasy world. Don’t get me wrong, you can do it, nothing is preventing you, but it will be a little weird if you do, unless you come up with some plausible explanation as to why it is so. As far as my world of Athron is concerned, I use a six day week, and again I use mnemonic devices:

 

 

 

Days of the Week

 

Monday – Muenday

 

Tuesday – Tuenday

 

Wednesday – Werensday

 

Thursday – Threnday

 

Friday – Forday

 

Saturday – Satrisday

 

 

 

The observant reader will notice two things. First, I’m only using six days in my weeks. I dropped Sunday, or its equivalent. Second, since, I’m only dealing with six items, I can limit the mnemonic device to the first letter or two. This is a little riskier than how I dealt with months because there isn’t a perfect correspondence between our real world weeks and Athron’s. Individuals might get confused reading my novels believing that time does not “add up” properly if they are not aware of the six-day vs. seven-day distinction. However, there are some interesting consequences. Since there are six days in every week and thirty days in every month, there are exactly five weeks in every month. No more, no less, and no remainder. Similarly, since there are three hundred and sixty days in every year, there are exactly sixty weeks in every year. No more, no less, and no remainder. As a result of this, the days of the week do not cycle through each month or each year as they do in our world. If Muenday is the 1st of Januillon (which it is), it is also the 1st of Febrillon, the 1st of Marill, etc…. In other words, every month begins on a Muenday. Similarly, the same can be said for every year. The 1st of Januillon or any other month is a Muenday every year. Likewise, the 3rd of any month in any year is a Werensday. Perhaps this seems too convenient or contrived, but realize the calendar is a human contrivance. All that is required is that the length of the year be of a particular easily divided number, something which happenstance can provide. In this case, the year consists of three hundred and sixty days. And so, the calendar is simply the civilization’s response to that easily divided number.

 

Leave a Reply